Lovejoy - Gifts 68514451672 51672 Size Radially Removable Space RRS090 $11 Lovejoy - 68514451672 51672 Size RRS090 Radially Removable Space Industrial Scientific Power Transmission Products Couplings, Collars Universal J $11 Lovejoy - 68514451672 51672 Size RRS090 Radially Removable Space Industrial Scientific Power Transmission Products Couplings, Collars Universal J Industrial Scientific , Power Transmission Products , Couplings, Collars Universal J,Size,$11,Space,Radially,/Astrachan382142.html,lvpos.vn,Removable,Lovejoy,51672,RRS090,-,68514451672 Industrial Scientific , Power Transmission Products , Couplings, Collars Universal J,Size,$11,Space,Radially,/Astrachan382142.html,lvpos.vn,Removable,Lovejoy,51672,RRS090,-,68514451672 Lovejoy - Gifts 68514451672 51672 Size Radially Removable Space RRS090

Lovejoy - Gifts 68514451672 51672 Size Radially Removable Space RRS090 List price

Lovejoy - 68514451672 51672 Size RRS090 Radially Removable Space

$11

Lovejoy - 68514451672 51672 Size RRS090 Radially Removable Space

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Product description

Bore Diameter String:1 Inches  |  Item Diameter String:2.11 Inches

This Lovejoy radially removable spacer (RRSC) coupling hub replaces hubs on Lovejoy RRSC type jaw style flexible couplings. This hub transfers shock and misalignment from the shaft to the center element of the coupling assembly for reduced wear on the shaft assembly and has tines that mesh with the spacer assembly to lock the hub into place. Lovejoy jaw style couplings are suitable for use in various industrial power transmission applications such as compressors, blowers, pumps, conveyors, mixers, and gear boxes, among others.

Flexible couplings are used to link two rotating shafts that are not aligned in order to transmit the rotational power, known as torque, from one shaft to the other. Most flexible couplings consist of two hubs and a middle assembly; each hub attaches to a shaft while the middle assembly flexes between the hubs to accommodate the misalignment of the two shafts. Shaft misalignments are generally either parallel or angular and cause complications to transmitting rotational power from one shaft to another in the form of stresses, loads, vibrations, and other forces, which vary from one type of misalignment to another. Flexible couplings are used in a broad range of applications, such as in motor vehicles, conveyors, escalators, agricultural, forestry and mining equipment, aeronautics, robotics and space exploration, among others.

Lovejoy manufactures flexible couplings, universal joints, variable speed drives and various other transmission and mechanical power products. Their products meet the standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the Deutsches Institut für Normung (DIN), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the American Gear Manufacturers Association (AGMA), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) for quality assurance. The company, founded in 1900, is based in Downers Grove, IL.

Lovejoy - 68514451672 51672 Size RRS090 Radially Removable Space

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22 September 2021

Arctic sea ice has likely reached its minimum extent for the year, at 4.72 million square kilometers (1.82 million square miles) on September 16, 2021, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. The 2021 minimum is the twelfth lowest in the nearly 43-year satellite record. The last 15 years are the lowest 15 sea ice extents in the satellite record. 

14 September 2021

Each September, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder informs the public of the annual Arctic sea ice minimum extent, an indicator of how climate change is affecting the Arctic, the fastest-warming region of the globe.

Scientists at Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University, the Arizona Geological Survey at the University of Arizona, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Boulder have been awarded almost $2 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a virtual reality teaching tool called Polar Explorer.

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) announced this week their participation in the 50x30 Coalition, a group of governments and cryosphere and emissions research institutions endorsing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50 percent by 2030. The Coalition’s founding members endorse the scientific consensus that failure to reach this milestone will result in temperature “overshoot,” in which emissions remain too high to hold Earth within 1.5 degrees Celsius of pre-industrial levels, leading to major and irreversible damages to the environment. Damage may be especially harmful for highly temperature-sensitive frozen components of the Earth system, with impacts ranging from sea level rise to infrastructure damage to food insecurity.

Arctic sea ice has likely reached its maximum extent for the year, at 14.77 million square kilometers (5.70 million square miles) on March 21, 2021, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. The 2021 maximum is tied with 2007 for seventh lowest in the 43-year satellite record. 

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